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Oak island's money pit.


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#1
Keanumoreira

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One dark night, a group of boys witnessed strange lights hovering over Canada's Oak island. The curious teenagers stepped foot on the island to investigate, only to find a strange looking pit. They dug at this very spot, finding coconut fibers not native to Canada or the island, and some strange tablet with carvings etched into it. Going down further, they found that every ten feet they descended, they would find a wooden plank blocking their way, and this continues down to an incredable 200 feet, but it doesn't end there. Today the money pit remains to be fully dug, since a defense mechanism in the pit prevents anyone from continuing by pouring in sea water from three sides of the island. It remains as one of the most ingenius treasure trove stashes in the world that is rumored to be hiding everything from the holy grail to the ark of the covenant. So what was so important that it to be hidden in perhaps the best hiding place and defense location?

#2
Chaosblade02

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I saw a TV show about this on the history channel awhile back. They believe the Knights Templar buried treasure at that location. My best guess would be that it is an interesting story, and they put it together to make an interesting TV show, but that is all it is. A story, unless someone digs up some treasure and proves something is there. If there was buried precious metals in the pit, even if it was 100ft deep or more, they have ways with current technology of detecting such things, ground penetrating radar, as well as powerful metal detectors that can even cue you in on which type of metal it is. Its called the "money pit" because many people wasted a lot of money digging there and found nothing impressive.

#3
Keanumoreira

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I saw a TV show about this on the history channel awhile back. They believe the Knights Templar buried treasure at that location. My best guess would be that it is an interesting story, and they put it together to make an interesting TV show, but that is all it is. A story, unless someone digs up some treasure and proves something is there. If there was buried precious metals in the pit, even if it was 100ft deep or more, they have ways with current technology of detecting such things, ground penetrating radar, as well as powerful metal detectors that can even cue you in on which type of metal it is. Its called the "money pit" because many people wasted a lot of money digging there and found nothing impressive.


I know of the names origin, and I also saw that show too, very intresting stuff. And I believe something very valuable is hidden down there, otherwise why would someone go through so much trouble to build such a thing.

#4
Chaosblade02

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I saw a TV show about this on the history channel awhile back. They believe the Knights Templar buried treasure at that location. My best guess would be that it is an interesting story, and they put it together to make an interesting TV show, but that is all it is. A story, unless someone digs up some treasure and proves something is there. If there was buried precious metals in the pit, even if it was 100ft deep or more, they have ways with current technology of detecting such things, ground penetrating radar, as well as powerful metal detectors that can even cue you in on which type of metal it is. Its called the "money pit" because many people wasted a lot of money digging there and found nothing impressive.


I know of the names origin, and I also saw that show too, very intresting stuff. And I believe something very valuable is hidden down there, otherwise why would someone go through so much trouble to build such a thing.


Build such a thing? Exactly what thing would you be referring to? Someone decided to dig a pit based on a myth and found basically nothing, and possibly were mistaken about certain things they saw as clues. And they hit water after they dug to a certain depth, which is also perfectly normal if you dig deep enough you hit ground water, especially on an island near the ocean. They tried to say it was a trap tunnel they breached that filled the hole with water, I say hogwash, they hit the water table.

There is evidence that the Knights Templar did come to America back in the middle ages, for that there is proof, but as for this money pit, there is no proof there is anything down there except for a lot of money down the drain. It would be interesting if someone would try again and with modern, state of the art technology, but considering how the last 2 attempts went, I doubt you will get anyone else to even bother.

The Templars were known to have an incredible amount of wealth in the form of gold and precious metals, and when the church dismantled their organization, they found very little in the form of actual material wealth, and it was believed that they took much of this wealth and hid or buried it somewhere. The Templars at one time were richer than the Catholic Church or the kings and queens of Europe, so this was a substantial amount of wealth we are talking about. So the possibility is open that there is some buried Templar treasure out there. The Templars also ran the first banking system, and gave out loans to ordinary people or even the kings of Europe.

#5
bben46

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The templars, like most wealthy organizations and people didn't keep the treasure in their strongholds because they loaned it out at interest to the very people who killed them for it. The French king and the Catholic church. Their treasure trove was the money that was owed to them by the Kings and many of the nobility of Europe.

The massacre of the templars accomplished exactly what it was intended to. It removed the massive debt that these nobles had accrued. The church itself had borrowed too. But they were also worried about the tremendous influence the templars exerted in church affairs and were concerned that the templars were going to make a play to put a templar in as the next pope. and effectively take over the church.

The story of huge amounts of treasure hidden in the strongholds was spread by these very debtors to get the support they needed from those who were not in debt to their eyeballs to help wipe out the templars.

#6
Chaosblade02

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The templars, like most wealthy organizations and people didn't keep the treasure in their strongholds because they loaned it out at interest to the very people who killed them for it. The French king and the Catholic church. Their treasure trove was the money that was owed to them by the Kings and many of the nobility of Europe.

The massacre of the templars accomplished exactly what it was intended to. It removed the massive debt that these nobles had accrued. The church itself had borrowed too. But they were also worried about the tremendous influence the templars exerted in church affairs and were concerned that the templars were going to make a play to put a templar in as the next pope. and effectively take over the church.

The story of huge amounts of treasure hidden in the strongholds was spread by these very debtors to get the support they needed from those who were not in debt to their eyeballs to help wipe out the templars.


I agree that the purpose of getting rid of the Templars was monetary alone, but it is known that the Templars kept detailed records that kept track of transactions made, and much of it wasn't accounted for. Certainly they took all the gold they could carry when they escaped to countries that were still friendly to them. And most of them did escape. They say not even 10% of them were apprehended.




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