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The media and the mods


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#11
Gstaff

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Thanks :)

#12
Phaedra13

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No, Gstaff. Thank you! You know how exciting it is to see your mod on the Bethblog? It feels really darn good! Also we can find out about cool mods that we may not have heard of. The interviews with modders are fantastic reads too.

#13
Sethicor

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ive played oblivion since its release, i got bored after beating it, it sat in my desk for almost a year, a friend o f mine took it and played it and while searching for cheats online stumbled across some mods. he told me about it and ive been here ever since. a game is great sure, but when someone with an expansive imagination and skill get their hands on it and make it there own and share it with us it is like a brand new game opened right up. ive messed with modding, im not very good ether, but when i look at modders like skycaptain, hexx, and AlienSlof i cant help but be knocked to the floor. and i believe that a mag s hould be made just to spot light modders of all games. these people put their heart into the mods and sometimes a couple beers, but it is a work of art no matter how y ou look at it, should it not get credit? hell people who throw paint onto a wall and say its art get credit, well i say its time for people who bust their asses to give players a better world some credit because ya know what, i wont be leaving my computer for a console any time soon and i am here every 8 hours checking for new mod and i would love to see a mod i find listed in a mag getting rated by the creators of the original game, that would be awesome.....ok im starting to forget what i was rambling about, but lets start a movement to make all games moddable >.>

#14
LazarusMace69

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Modders are the keystone of gaming for me. In fact, from my point of view, it's more about the mods than the game itself really. Okay, you can make and sell a game and very often those who made it seemingly take no interest in it after that, but there are a few like Morrowind, Oblivion and STALKER, where the creators actively encourage modding. I wouldn't still be playing any of these games now if it weren't for the creativity of the modding comunity, so I hope they keep up their great work. I have tried making a few little mods of my own for Oblivion, but you could say that I am bordering on the slightly crap! But I have stuck at it because I am consistantly impressed by the output from the really talented modders. Love it!

#15
stsikel

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I've always felt that PCZone in the UK has always been friendlier to mods and modding than PC Gamer, which has always had a bit of a "corporate" feel to it.

#16
Glaad

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I'd first like to say personally, I adore the modder community. Mostly though for reasons that have already been posted.

However, there are many reasons the modder community has yet to stand long in the spotlight.

First and foremost, not every game that has a mod community has a publisher that promotes changing of their product. In fact, changing such a product tends to be against most EULAs. Luckily there are some wonderful companies such as Bethesda Softworks, that promote user generated content.

Not all of the mod community are professionals in the field. Do you believe little league deserves the coverage that the professional baseball players get? Not to say some of the content isn't amazing! But I know I shouldn't be recognized for any content I've ever developed, except perhaps for flaming. Moreover, development teams are often more widely recognized by a team, name and logo, not as anonymous individuals, where it seems most of the user generated content comes from. This has more than one effect. Should the content violate anything (whether it be against the EULA, break the rating given to the game or be actually illegal) there is little connecting the non professional developer with their content. Furthermore without being published, credit is easily stolen.

Professionally developed content also tends to be more full, more complete and (to a degree) debugged to work with a greater variety of platforms. Probably because they are under contract and are ultimately getting paid to finish not to develop. This is only a tendency however and does not apply to even all the content on this site alone. But it also leaves the community more open to continue to keep games fresh and removes restrictions (or leaves them free to drop them on a whim).

The industry makes most of its money often around initial release, when the games costs the most. Advertisement of various sources goes into it. But they can sell games at higher cost because they are fresh and new. An excited mod community does add to the hype, but its greatest advertisement potential is after user content has begun development. This is a business don't let any one try to fool you.

Don't let this get you down though! Gaming is a relatively new industry. Less than 2 decades ago we could purchase games that installed from 1.44 megabyte floppy disks. The mod community is constantly growing. With support from companies like Bethesda and Bioware; the release of development toolsets; and information becoming more readily available the mod community will get the recognition it deserves. Just give it some time, eventually more people will warm up to the idea.

#17
thehim87

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I've always felt that PCZone in the UK has always been friendlier to mods and modding than PC Gamer, which has always had a bit of a "corporate" feel to it.


Defenitely. I've always felt a difference of tone coming from big video magazines towards modders. A bit of scorn and distance towards it. It's ignoring how many of there readers use mods sometime barely experience the vanilla version of a game.

With this hypothesis : only the best game have a large modding community.

#18
lg9142

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I'm an Australian, and the two Aussie PC enthusiast/PC gaming magazines both dedicate quite a bit to modding.

Atomic, a coder/hacker/overclocker/hardware enthusiast targeted magazine is written for by Ashton Mills, creator of Martigens Monster Mod and Mutant Mod for Oblivion and Fallout 3 respectively. They have a section dedicated solely to mods.

PC Powerplay, a PC gaming oriented magazine, has had a mod section as far back as I can remember, and even occasionally reviews mod as full games.

Both magazines really encourage and support modders, which makes you question the motives of the UK magazines (And US by the sounds of it as well). Perhaps there's no monetary incentive, or perhaps game publishers are influencing the magazine content(Official Ninty/PS3/360 magazine style) and don't want to see mods in the magazine.

Modding is a vital part of the gaming community, and the media needs to latch on and support this.

#19
Axil

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For me neither PC Zone or PC Gamer in the UK (the latter which I have written freelance articles for in the past) really do modders any favors (or these days the average PC Gamer due to the way the quality of journalism has gone down in both).

I find there is much better mod support in the UK PC gaming press in Total PC Gaming (though unfortunately some of the reporting is just as inaccurate as the previous mentioned publications)

#20
Dark0ne

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Interestingly this bomb shell has just struck. Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 (the sequel to the highly popular MW that managed to take a significant cut of the CSS pie) has just announced the game won't have mod or dedicated server support.

No dedicated server support on a competitive PC gaming is ridiculous.

Blurb here.




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