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Installing\Buying a new PSU

psu power supply

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#1
Jakeasaurouz

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I have a question about computer power supplies and their compatibility. Ungh... I'm not actually sure how to ask this, much less how to google it -_-

 

So I'll just describe the situation I guess. 

I have a low-profile PC a mini-atx motherboard. Not entirely sure if thay's what it's actually called... it's just a smaller case and motherboard. It came prebuilt and I added a graphics card. But the PSU isn't up to par with it. It works because it has a built in over-clocker and I reduced it (the complete opposite of what an OC is for :P)

 

Anyway, I'm considering buying a new PSU but since the computer is low profile, I have limited options. I've considered installing it on the outside of the case and it sounds sort of like a viable option. 

 

So... I guess with all that being said: To what extent should I be concerned about compatibility?

 

 

PSU I'm Coinsidering: http://www.amazon.co...=A2NG4HB43UEDVL

 

My PC: http://www.amazon.co..._pr_product_top

 

Graphics card I have:http://www.asus.com/...AH6570DI1GD3LP/



#2
Illiad86

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Just looked at the inside of your PC there, it uses a low profile PSU. That one you are considering will not fit in it. Amazon has some for it:

 

http://www.amazon.co...data/B00HO2G0VK

 

Don't see how the PSU can't handle the graphics card (no outside power connection needed), unless they put the bare bare minimum inside your case (which most pre-builts do). That link is just the same PSU that's probably inside the case already. You'll be lucky to find an actual name-brand PSU that will fit in there.

 

Mounting outside the case just feels like a big no-no to me. There's a lot of power going through those things. Plus you'd have a bunch of ugly wires sticking outside of your nice little compy there :tongue:

 

What exactly is the problem? Are you getting random shutdowns since you put the graphics card in? Is it BSODing?

 

 

 

But the PSU isn't up to par with it. It works because it has a built in over-clocker and I reduced it (the complete opposite of what an OC is for :tongue:)

 

What do you exactly mean by that? The graphics card has an OC program? OCing something like that is kind of pointless. That card is bare minimum for playing HD video properly. Seems odd they would include an OC program for an unpowered card as well.


Edited by Illiad86, 03 May 2014 - 11:11 PM.


#3
Jakeasaurouz

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Wow, thanks for a quick reply :)

 

The program that I'm talking about is GPU-Tweak. The default clock speed is 600~ and the default memory clock is 1200~ I can get to 700 on the clock speed but anything past like 750 makes it "crash" to a black screen. And if I change the memory clock at all I get a checkerboard pattern all over the screen and a hard crash. The PSU is bare minimum for the system as you suggested. 

 

So there's no real problem aside from the desire to increase the clock speed.

 

Theoretically, if I did install the new PSU outside the case, would the cables still be compatible? Or would it be sort of like trying to plug an american plug into a European outlet?



#4
Jakeasaurouz

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What I might do is just transplant everything to a larger case. Maybe a new motherboard.



#5
bben46

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Those mini atx systems are good for basic office work and facebook. But don't make good systems for games like Skyrim. A new case will probably fit your current Mini ATX board until you can upgrade. However, they often come with the OEM version of Windows,  and Microsoft doesn't like to allow you to transfer OEM versions to new systems. :pinch:

 

Be sure to get  a good quality PS. There are a lot of no name cheap imports that will not actually output the wattage they claim for extended periods of time ( they can fail if actually run at the rated wattage for more than a few hours)

 

There are two number you need to look at - the important one is continuous rated output , the less important is peak (or possibly called maximum) output (usually much higher then continuous) - It is expected to run at the continuous rated output for long periods -  PSU is not expected to run at the peak rated output all the time - but only for short periods of extreme use. Be sure the continuous rating is higher than the amount of power you expect to need. :thumbsup:



#6
Werne

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The program that I'm talking about is GPU-Tweak. The default clock speed is 600~ and the default memory clock is 1200~ I can get to 700 on the clock speed but anything past like 750 makes it "crash" to a black screen. And if I change the memory clock at all I get a checkerboard pattern all over the screen and a hard crash. The PSU is bare minimum for the system as you suggested. 

 

So there's no real problem aside from the desire to increase the clock speed.

Gateway PCs have decent mITX PSUs, I have one and it can handle the rated 220W without a problem. Your graphics card is unstable because it needs more voltage, too much frequency on the GPU will crash the driver and too much frequency on VRAM will do the checkerboard. A PSU won't change anything in regards to that since GPUs/CPUs and RAM/VRAM modules don't scale infinitely as long as you feed them current (PSU gives more current, not more voltage) - they need more voltage, which you can't provide on a budget card since it has no voltage control built-in.

 

Simplified - you have a bad overclocker, not even a 1500W PSU would change that.

 

Your GPU is decent (17% overclock ain't bad) and your VRAM modules are crap. Mine's the opposite, 1125 to 1550 on memory (425MHz gain), 1000 to 1085 on GPU (85MHz gain), GPU sucks. Anyway, since the card you have has locked voltage control, the only way to go higher is to actually do a hard volt mod (solder a new resistor for voltage control) but the VRMs on it are junk so there's no use unless benching for HWBot or using LN2 or something, you'd just blow the damn thing up. If you want more performance, get a real card and a real PC and stop fiddling with a HTPC card.


Edited by Werne, 08 May 2014 - 01:11 PM.






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