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Recruiting team for PC game like Skyrim

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#11
Endermod

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If you're going to start a business, you must get some degree of knowledge on how to run one. It may seem easy on the outside, but running any kind of franchise or business is stressful, frustrating and very very costly. I'm not trying to discourage you, but you won't succeed without some knowledge of what you're doing.
 
I work in the car industry; there are a lot of parallels between making cars and making games. A good car appeals to an enthusiast's heart the way a good game does, and the best cars are the ones with a soul. Like gamers, nearly every enthusiast has their own idea of what that all means, and like gamers many strike out on their own in an effort to bring that idea into the world.
 
Sadly most of them fail, often very early in the project. Most of the time they have a wonderful idea, but no idea of how to run a business. And no matter how good your idea is, you'll need to support it financially-either yourself or by paying someone else, which has other problems. Don't let that happen to you.


I have seventeen tabs in Google Chrome now, all of them about marketing and business. I'm trying. :P

#12
Beriallord

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Endermod, maybe it would help if you show off some of your work so that people know you're actually serious and have the talent to back up your ideas.  Share credentials, education, etc.   If you are serious, then you got a lot of work that you personally need to do before you can even consider getting a team behind you.  Ideas without the talent or knowledge to back them up is doing nothing but blowing out hot air.  And not only that but one has to assume that everyone is trying to scam on the internet until proven otherwise.

 

Some ideas on ways to showcase your ideas:

 

Come up with some artwork depicting the game, this needs to be professionally done.  Hire an artist unless you happen to be a pro. 

Prove you are forking out money out of pocket to further your game.  You can do this by hiring some modders to do work for you. 

Serious people will get a business loan.  And if you can convince a bank to give you a loan based on your vision for a company, then more people will take you seriously. 

 

If you aren't prepared to at least do the above, then nobody is going to take you seriously, nor should they.

 

But instead you're coming here and:

 

Asking for help developing a complex game without sharing any credentials

Asking for donations.

 

So it seems to me like you either don't have your act together, which means nobody should take you seriously, or you're trying to scam for donations.


Edited by Beriallord, 18 May 2014 - 12:36 AM.


#13
Endermod

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Endermod, maybe it would help if you show off some of your work so that people know you're actually serious and have the talent to back up your ideas.  Share credentials, education, etc.   If you are serious, then you got a lot of work that you personally need to do before you can even consider getting a team behind you.  Ideas without the talent or knowledge to back them up is doing nothing but blowing out hot air.  And not only that but one has to assume that everyone is trying to scam on the internet until proven otherwise.
 
Some ideas on ways to showcase your ideas:
 
Come up with some artwork depicting the game, this needs to be professionally done.  Hire an artist unless you happen to be a pro. 
Prove you are forking out money out of pocket to further your game.  You can do this by hiring some modders to do work for you. 
Serious people will get a business loan.  And if you can convince a bank to give you a loan based on your vision for a company, then more people will take you seriously. 
 
If you aren't prepared to at least do the above, then nobody is going to take you seriously, nor should they.
 
But instead you're coming here and:
 
Asking for help developing a complex game without sharing any credentials
Asking for donations.
 
So it seems to me like you either don't have your act together, which means nobody should take you seriously, or you're trying to scam for donations.

Thanks for the tips, although I already am trying to learn some stuff and make a prototype of the game. Just code some basic things. :)
Also, I'm not asking for donations in money, I'm asking for donations in skill.

Edited by Endermod, 18 May 2014 - 05:41 PM.


#14
Beriallord

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Thanks for the tips, although I already am trying to learn some stuff and make a prototype of the game. Just code some basic things. :smile:
Also, I'm not asking for donations in money, I'm asking for donations in skill.

 

 

Not asking for monetary donations? 

 

 

 

I'm thinking either kickstarter(unlikely), or donations. The most likely route is trying to use not that much money.  I mean if we make our own game engine, we already don't need that much. What else to pay for? Does steam charge? I know I'm kind of an idiot on this subject. I would appreciate a few pointers, if you have time.

 

Also do you have any freaking clue what all is involved in making a game engine?  Do you know why most developers just reuse an existing engine for their games?  Because its cheaper than making a new one. 

 

If you're aiming for a graphics heavy game, then Cryengine 3 would be perfect.  If you're aiming for an engine that a lot of people here might be familiar with then the Gamebyro engine would be perfect. 

 

Here is an example of a small dev team that has their act together can accomplish:

 

http://forums.nexusm...me-deliverance/

 

Kickstarter:

 

https://www.kickstar...ome-deliverance

 

Take note of how they're advertising their game, and what you're going to need to be able to have to show before people would even consider donating money.  If you aren't prepared to do at least this much then you should drop the idea right now.

 

And you still haven't explained what your credentials are, how much experience & education, show some examples of mods/projects you worked on, etc.  If you're still a kid in HS, then I'd take the idea and put it on a shelf somewhere until you've gotten your degree in Computer Science, and have worked a few years in the industry.  None of those guys working on Kingdom Come Deliverance are scrubs, they're all highly skilled and experienced. 

 

The proper way to advertise your credentials (if you got any):

 

My name is "Insert name" I got 10 years experience in C++, and I worked on "insert projects here":

 

"Post a link to your website and facebook"

 

"Post links to your work"

 

"Post references from other professionals"

 

"Post links to mods you've worked on"

 

So yeah, if all you got to contribute to a project is a vision, then you better be willing to pay money. 


Edited by Beriallord, 19 May 2014 - 08:22 AM.


#15
Endermod

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 Thanks for the tips, although I already am trying to learn some stuff and make a prototype of the game. Just code some basic things. :smile:
Also, I'm not asking for donations in money, I'm asking for donations in skill.
 

 
Not asking for monetary donations? 
 
 
 

I'm thinking either kickstarter(unlikely), or donations. The most likely route is trying to use not that much money.  I mean if we make our own game engine, we already don't need that much. What else to pay for? Does steam charge? I know I'm kind of an idiot on this subject. I would appreciate a few pointers, if you have time.

 
Also do you have any freaking clue what all is involved in making a game engine?  Do you know why most developers just reuse an existing engine for their games?  Because its cheaper than making a new one. 
 
If you're aiming for a graphics heavy game, then Cryengine 3 would be perfect.  If you're aiming for an engine that a lot of people here might be familiar with then the Gamebyro engine would be perfect. 
 
Here is an example of a small dev team that has their act together can accomplish:
 
http://forums.nexusm...me-deliverance/
 
Kickstarter:
 
https://www.kickstar...ome-deliverance
 
Take note of how they're advertising their game, and what you're going to need to be able to have to show before people would even consider donating money.  If you aren't prepared to do at least this much then you should drop the idea right now.
 
And you still haven't explained what your credentials are, how much experience & education, show some examples of mods/projects you worked on, etc.  If you're still a kid in HS, then I'd take the idea and put it on a shelf somewhere until you've gotten your degree in Computer Science, and have worked a few years in the industry.  None of those guys working on Kingdom Come Deliverance are scrubs, they're all highly skilled and experienced. 
 
The proper way to advertise your credentials (if you got any):
 
My name is "Insert name" I got 10 years experience in C++, and I worked on "insert projects here":
 
"Post a link to your website and facebook"
 
"Post links to your work"
 
"Post references from other professionals"
 
"Post links to mods you've worked on"
 
So yeah, if all you got to contribute to a project is a vision, then you better be willing to pay money. 

I said "I'm thinking either kickstarter(unlikely), or donations.".
By I'm thinking, I mean it's nothing final. Undecided.

#16
Vagrant0

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The harsh reality is this... If you have nothing concrete and playable to show regarding your game idea, it is essentially meaningless. It doesn't have to be pretty, it doesn't have to be fleshed out, but it should try to show the sorts of things you plan on doing and are personally capable of achieving within a given timeframe.

 

It doesn't matter if you're asking for talent, asking for money, or just trying to develop interest in the project; if no actual work is done developing that project you won't get anywhere with it. There are thousands of examples of indie games out there who have tried all manner of methods, learn from their mistakes as well as what they did right. I've seen countless people with 10-20 years experience developing games just spin their wheels uselessly by trying to get backing or interest in their project before there is actually enough to show or by relying too much on hype to push their project to completion before running out of steam. If you can't bring a game to workability within a year or two of working on it alone or with a close group of friends, chances are you won't ever complete it or get anyone to back your project.

 

If you don't know how to code, and don't know or cannot afford (now) someone to code for you, strongly consider fixing this or considering a different line of work. And before you do take people on for the project, make sure you have an actual lawyer draw up the contracts regarding wages, percentages, usage rights, ect or else the project can become an absolute hell... Even if they're your family or best friend, legal disputes can sink a project almost instantly. There is a reason why successful indie games tend to be done solely by one person, or by an already established company.



#17
Endermod

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The harsh reality is this... If you have nothing concrete and playable to show regarding your game idea, it is essentially meaningless. It doesn't have to be pretty, it doesn't have to be fleshed out, but it should try to show the sorts of things you plan on doing and are personally capable of achieving within a given timeframe.
 
It doesn't matter if you're asking for talent, asking for money, or just trying to develop interest in the project; if no actual work is done developing that project you won't get anywhere with it. There are thousands of examples of indie games out there who have tried all manner of methods, learn from their mistakes as well as what they did right. I've seen countless people with 10-20 years experience developing games just spin their wheels uselessly by trying to get backing or interest in their project before there is actually enough to show or by relying too much on hype to push their project to completion before running out of steam. If you can't bring a game to workability within a year or two of working on it alone or with a close group of friends, chances are you won't ever complete it or get anyone to back your project.
 
If you don't know how to code, and don't know or cannot afford (now) someone to code for you, strongly consider fixing this or considering a different line of work. And before you do take people on for the project, make sure you have an actual lawyer draw up the contracts regarding wages, percentages, usage rights, ect or else the project can become an absolute hell... Even if they're your family or best friend, legal disputes can sink a project almost instantly. There is a reason why successful indie games tend to be done solely by one person, or by an already established company.

Thanks for the information.

Can anyone please say something positive? :P

#18
Vindekarr

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Can anyone please say something positive? :tongue:

 

 

I really hope you've been listening to what people have been telling you.

 

> You only have yourself right now. You don't have any programming experience, let alone game design experience.

> No funding whatsoever.

> No clear idea on how to get funding.

> No workspace.

> No plan for what sort of game you're actually going to make.

> Limited knowledge of how games are even made in the first place.

> No experience or formal training in running a business.

 

Right now your project simply isn't going to happen. You don't have the money for it, and you don't actually know how to make games. What you should do, is go to college and then university. Study business, study coding, get a job for a programmer and gain practical experience. Come back in five or six years when you know what you're doing, and I assure you that you will succeed.

 

If you're serious about this, then these things will be no problem at all. If you aren't willing to study and work for your project, then you should probably quit now. That will sound extremely harsh, but it's true. If someone with no background could simply snap their fingers and make a good game, we would have a lot more successful indy titles.

 

Making anything takes blood, sweat and tears in enormous quantities. Are you really willing to make the life changes this is going to require? that's what you have to ask yourself.

 

I wish I could say something positive, but I would be doing you a disservice by lying and sugar-coating the situation. You can't make the games you want to make as a hobby, if you're serious then go make this into your career. Otherwise it's just not going to be possible.



#19
Endermod

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Can anyone please say something positive? :tongue:
 

 
I really hope you've been listening to what people have been telling you.
 
> You only have yourself right now. You don't have any programming experience, let alone game design experience.
> No funding whatsoever.
> No clear idea on how to get funding.
> No workspace.
> No plan for what sort of game you're actually going to make.
> Limited knowledge of how games are even made in the first place.
> No experience or formal training in running a business.
 
Right now your project simply isn't going to happen. You don't have the money for it, and you don't actually know how to make games. What you should do, is go to college and then university. Study business, study coding, get a job for a programmer and gain practical experience. Come back in five or six years when you know what you're doing, and I assure you that you will succeed.
 
If you're serious about this, then these things will be no problem at all. If you aren't willing to study and work for your project, then you should probably quit now. That will sound extremely harsh, but it's true. If someone with no background could simply snap their fingers and make a good game, we would have a lot more successful indy titles.
 
Making anything takes blood, sweat and tears in enormous quantities. Are you really willing to make the life changes this is going to require? that's what you have to ask yourself.
 
I wish I could say something positive, but I would be doing you a disservice by lying and sugar-coating the situation. You can't make the games you want to make as a hobby, if you're serious then go make this into your career. Otherwise it's just not going to be possible.
If not positive, at least useful information. Thanks.

Edited by Endermod, 23 May 2014 - 09:48 AM.


#20
QQuix

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Can anyone please say something positive? :tongue:

 

 

Why don't you start getting your hands dirty by developing a Skyrim or Oblivion mod with some of the features you plan for your game

 

Using vanilla and modders resources you don't have to deal modeling and texturing. And dont have to spend any money. Just your own time.

 

Start with a small, one-man, one-month project. Then go to a six-month project. After this time you can check if this is really what you like to do (I did this and I am 5.5 years, probably 3,000 to 5,000 hours into my project and loving each minute of it)







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