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[Suggestion] Make a .txt file with mods you have installed

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#1
ilogiccall

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Had this idea when I formatted my Windows yesterday. Had to write all the 100+ mods I had, one by one, in a .txt file... so stressful

Is it possible to implement in Vortex an option that does exactly that? 

Creates a .txt file or something with all the mods you have installed...

Thanks in advance, sorry if it's the wrong category to make the post. 



#2
HadToRegister

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Had this idea when I formatted my Windows yesterday. Had to write all the 100+ mods I had, one by one, in a .txt file... so stressful

Is it possible to implement in Vortex an option that does exactly that? 

Creates a .txt file or something with all the mods you have installed...

Thanks in advance, sorry if it's the wrong category to make the post. 

 

 

C:\users\YOUR NAME\AppData\Local\GAME DIRECTORY\plugins.txt



#3
Rattledagger

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HadToRegister, many mods does not have a plugin, meaning plugins.txt will only give a partial list.

I'm not aware of Vortex having any human-readable list of all installed mods, meaning Vortex getting such a list would definitely be an advantage.

#4
1ae0bfb8

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I knocked this up a minute ago, you can do this, or a variation of it in Powershell;

 

cd <your mods directory>
Get-ChildItem -Recurse | Select-Object -ExpandProperty Fullname | Out-File <your mods directory>\mymodfile.txt


#5
Carreg0

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I, to, would like an easy means to do what the OP asked.  Ideally, it should spit the contents of the Vortex "MODS" display to a text file using the same filters and sort order selected for the display.  The fields would be separated by tabs to allow easy import to a spreadsheet.

 

This would allow me to answer questions like "How is profile X different from profile Y" by feeding the text output of each into WinMerge.

 

As to the following suggestion:

 

I knocked this up a minute ago, you can do this, or a variation of it in Powershell;

cd <your mods directory>
Get-ChildItem -Recurse | Select-Object -ExpandProperty Fullname | Out-File <your mods directory>\mymodfile.txt

 

This produces a list of every file under <your mods directory> including all the contents of the folders and subfolders.

 

From ...\Vortex\skyrim\mods it lists every from every mod installed (according to Vortex), including those not enabled.

 

From ...\Skyrim\data it lists every file installed in Skyrim.

 

Neither is what the OP is asking for, which is, most likely, the "MODS" display of Vortex converted to text, Ideally filtered by, for example, "Status: Enabled".

 

The best you can do with Powershell is get a list of all possibly installed mods (or rather the archive name, which is usually close) with:

 

 

get-childitem | select-object -expandproperty name

 

Then you would have to edit the file and remove lines corresponding to mods which are not "Status: Enabled" in the left column of the mods page.  This at least saves a lot of typing, but is still laborious.



#6
Rattledagger

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For everyone like me that haven't the foggiest idea how to use Powershell, you can get the lists by opening-up a command-window, cd to the \mods\-directory and using a trivial

 

dir /b > list_of_directories.txt

 

or

 

dir /b /s > list_of_all_files_and_directories.txt

 

While these commands can give a list of the currently installed mods, often the more relevant is the active mods for a current profile, preferably sortable by "install" order and more advanced with indication that mod A "loads after B", while mod C "depends on mod D".



#7
HadToRegister

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Windows Key + X = opens a menu with the Powershell option for quick access



#8
Rattledagger

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Windows Key + X = opens a menu with the Powershell option for quick access

 

Starting a program != knowing how to use the program.

 

Now of course I can copy & paste the commands posted above to get an output, actually the second example isn't usable as it stand since it don't create any file-output, but since I've used DOS back in the days I do remember how to use dir.

 

For someone that's never used dir I would still say it's much easier to open-up a cmd-window, for so typing-in

 

cd \path\to\directory\

dir /b > modfiles.txt

 

than it is to open-up a powershell, for so typing-in

 

cd \path\to\directory\

gci | select-object -expandproperty name | out-file modfiles.txt



#9
1ae0bfb8

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you pays your money, you takes your choice.

 

i didnt say you MUST use that powershell script. it was something i knocked up in a minute, as i put in the post. There's many different ways to write the contents of a directory to a file. there's no right/wrong if it produces the correct result. it ain't a competition, it's a forum to offer help. i did that. you seem to exist here simply to offer pedantry rather than actual assistance.



#10
HadToRegister

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Windows Key + X = opens a menu with the Powershell option for quick access

 

Starting a program != knowing how to use the program.

 

Now of course I can copy & paste the commands posted above to get an output, actually the second example isn't usable as it stand since it don't create any file-output, but since I've used DOS back in the days I do remember how to use dir.

 

For someone that's never used dir I would still say it's much easier to open-up a cmd-window, for so typing-in

 

cd \path\to\directory\

dir /b > modfiles.txt

 

than it is to open-up a powershell, for so typing-in

 

cd \path\to\directory\

gci | select-object -expandproperty name | out-file modfiles.txt

 

 

 

Just open the directory, in explorer, EX "D:\Games\Steam\Steamapps\common\Skyrim Sepcial Edition\Data" then type CMD in the address bar, a CMD window opens in the directory without having to CD anywhere







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