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Defining specific footstep sound


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#1
ModBrains

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Trying to make a constructable concrete floor tile.

Have duplicated a wood floor tile (shackmidfloor02 or some such) as the starting point.

Cannot for the life of me find where to set the footstep sound when walking on it. Currently it sounds like wood, but looks like concrete.

Have looked in the mesh in nifskope - can't find anything there.

Have looked in the material file in Material Editor - can't find anything there.

Have looked in Creation Kit and FO4Edit - can't find anything there.

I've found the FSTP entries, but haven't found any way they are linked to materials/objects or materials/objects are linked to them.

 

Anyone know how to choose the footstep sound that plays when walking on buildable flooring?



#2
DieFeM

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It is defined by the collision of the model, in 3dsmax (Collision Group->Material Type), I think this can not be changed in Nifskope, because it is converted to binary data. I don't say it can't be overridden in the CK but, if it is possible, I don't know how.



#3
Carreau

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It is defined by the collision of the model, in 3dsmax (Collision Group->Material Type), I think this can not be changed in Nifskope, because it is converted to binary data. I don't say it can't be overridden in the CK but, if it is possible, I don't know how.

This.  The materials are set by the nif.  The CK links certain materials to impact sets, which is where the game will play wood steps for wooden items, etc.

 

https://forums.nexus...up3ds-max-2013/



#4
ModBrains

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Thanks for the replies.

I had a feeling it was a pretty deep set attribute, but didn't realize it was set so early in the development pipeline.






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