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Tannin42

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  1. Don't take this the wrong way, just something I have to ask to rule out the most obvious explanation: Vortex has a button to "Power off when done" so you can start a bunch of downloads and go away and then Vortex turns your system off when all downloads are completed. I've seen systems where, due to driver issues or something, they will reboot instead of shutting down. You're saying the downloads aren't done so I'll assume this isn't it though. I haven't heard of others having an issue like this when I was still supporting Vortex. One thing that may be relevant is that while downloading, Vortex will send a signal to windows every minute to *prevent* sleep mode. This is so that if you leave your system running while doing a large download it doesn't active sleep mode. Maybe there is Your system randomly rebooting is almost certainly some sort of driver problem. I wouldn't suspect a hardware defect or virus because why would that only happen while you download something? But maybe there is a driver that doesn't deal well with the "don't go to sleep" signal? Since this is almost certainly a low-level issue - I can assure you Vortex has no code to trigger reboot other the one mentioned above - maybe look at your windows event viewer (there under windows logs -> system), if you're lucky it will tell you what triggered the reboot if it was indeed software triggered or it might have error messages for driver errors.
  2. The error message is unfortunately truncated so it's hard to tell but I can almost guarantee you that this is a broken or incomplete .NET install. One thing to keep in mind is that you likely have multiple copies of .NET because its versions aren't usually backwards compatible and there are variants with and without UI so it's perfectly possible that one .NET application works fine because it's using the .NET 5 installation on your system while another fails because the .NET 6 install is kaputt. And because .NET installers are such a clusterf***, many .NET applications nowadays ship with their own full copy of .NET so you might even have multiple copies of the same .NET version, one of which works the other doesn't. In this case the System.Windows.Forms library - which is part of the ".NET desktop runtime" but not part of the ".NET runtime" (great job microsoft, really, great job) is either missing, broken or inaccessible. Vortex isn't imagining that, the error message is from .net itself, not from Vortex. The solution Picky posted (or, more precisely, the wiki link it leads to) should absolutely fix all three potential problems that could cause this error.
  3. Depending on the Game it can be complex, the documentation isn’t wrong but over-simplified (the wiki tends to prioritize simplicity over correctness). Hard-link is the default because it has best game compatibility but it requires staging to be on the same drive as where the mods need to be put for the game to find them. This is the often mis-described. Not every game reads its mods from the game installation directory, some require them to be in the windows „documents“ directory for example, then staging needs to be on the same drive as your documents directory. And then there are games (e.g. Witcher 3) that require some mods in documents and others in the game directory so unless those are on the same drive, hard-link deployment is not an option no matter where you put staging.
  4. With default settings vortex does not download multiple files at the same time because - assuming everything works correctly - one server serving you one file at full speed causes the least amount of overhead and your system gets that file sooner and can start installing the mod sooner. It’s a better use of available resources all around compared to trying to download multiple files at once, then potentially unpacking them at the same time. If your downloads do not happen at full speed (your connection speed) you can increase the number of download threads in settings (vortex will use up to four threads per file so 8 threads means two files downloads with 4 open connections each) But if the server doesn’t give you max speed, that indicates the server is at capacity so using multiple threads just means the available bandwidth is split up more and more bandwidth is lost to overhead. Changing the server in site settings makes more sense.
  5. Does the file in the error message exist? Is it open in another application? Is it write protected? try moving/deleting it manually and see if that works, if it fails, restart Vortex, maybe it's Vortex itself keeping it locked?
  6. new-file-monitor is a utility that game extensions may use but don't have to. It's basically there to detect files added to the game directory by mods that Vortex can't automatically assign to the corresponding mod without help. Think mods that create a log file or save their configuration to a newly created file. For Vortex to detect that files were added compared to the last time it ran it has to take note of which files were there before. This doesn't usually take that long, in your set up though it tracks over a million files apparently in at least 360 thousand directories. That seems - excessive. You might want to check if your setup actually contains that many files or whether there is some kind of directory link shenanigans that confuse it. Otherwise it might also be safe to disable the new-file-monitor extension unless the Starfield extension uses it (one of the current Vortex devs should know) because previously I think it was only Stardew Valley that needed the information anyway. Finally, my personal preference is to disable the automatic deployment anyway, only deploy once before actually starting the game - especially when setups start to get bigger.
  7. Vortex probably detects both installations and gives one priority but you can manually change the game directory from the games screen. If you manually set the game directory that always has precedence over what Vortex auto-detected. Technically I don't think there's anything stopping you from "purge" the existing (gog) mod install change the game directory to the steam instance deploy again In regards to the mod deploy at least it shouldn't matter to Vortex that it's now deploying to a different target directory than before or that that directory contains a different game version/store variant. The only thing I could see as potentially problematic would be a) fomods that installed different things based on which CC content was available at the time the mod was originally installed b) savegames, ini files and profiles in general since the gog instance has its own copy of all that so it might be a good idea to clone the profile you're going to be using first, enable the clone and then not touch the original profile while Vortex is "targeting" the other game install. I don't think savegames should be a big deal as Vortex doesn't "remember" save games, it doesn't care about saves appearing or disappearing but it does maintain copies of the ini files with each profile so it might end up mixing settings from the two instances, not entirely sure how robust that is.
  8. IIRC the tool is required to determine the unique id of the mod which is required to control the load order. So it doesn't change the mod files, it just has to read some meta data from it.
  9. Vortex doesn't explicitly support _any_ browser, it just talks to Windows, going "please open this Link in whatever browser the user has configured as the default" and "if a default browser tries to open a nxm:// link in the default application, call me!". Whether your Browser supports these interfaces is entirely up to the browser. If it doesn't though, it's shite, don't use it. I really don't care what awesome features it may have, if it refuses to adhere to standards - to me that'd be a total no-go.
  10. The error message is from the server authentication, effectively denying you use the server api. This could be - a temporary server hiccup, does it still happen now? - your account somehow got corrupted or is banned (I can't verify that you're logged in to post on the forum here is the same you were trying in Vortex) - The server is bugged - Vortex is bugged and trying to do something it shouldn't attempt The latter two are less likely as they would likely be encountered by more users
  11. Vortex itself doesn't make use of multiple threads but most of what Vortex does is either I/O limited (downloading/copying/linking files and such), handled by libraries (that _are_ multithreaded if necessary) (like extracting archives, hashing files, ...) or would always be single-threaded even when using other technology (UI rendering). Downloading files for example would usually be limited by your internet or disk speed, even on 1GB/s internet downloading at full speed from a premium server I had no problem with my cpu becoming a bottleneck. The main CPU load when downloading files (from nexusmods) is ssl decryption (because all downloads from this site are needlessly delivered via https) but Vortex uses a standard library for that (openssl/libressl), it's not up to Vortex whether that happens single- or multi-threaded.
  12. I'm still around, still need to mod my games. ;)
  13. Yes, Vortex is open source and you can make a Linux native version. In fact, Vortex should mostly just build on Linux with a few optional components failing. The question is how far you want to go. The basis of Vortex is written platform independent. There are a few windows-native libraries but this is for the most part because node.js is mimicking posix and while that works on windows, it's not covering all of windows' functionality or would perform badly. Those native modules wouldn't be required on Linux/Mac OS as in: you wouldn't have to port them, just replace with simple JS code. Just because Vortex builds and runs on Linux doesn't necessarily make it particularly useful out of the box though. It will work fine with games that run natively on Linux but to manage games that are emulated through wine/proton, you'd either need (part of) Vortex to also run in that same sandbox as the game or you need to extend Vortex to know about wine and deal with it specifically. And then you might need to support different ways to configure wine. E.g. as far as I understand it, the steam deck uses a separate sandbox for each game whereas someone setting things up themselves might run all games in a single sandbox. Another user (NicBomb) has done quite a bit of work on Linux support (https://github.com/NicBomb/vortex) unfortunately he also insisted on changing the build system and on making sweeping coding style changes in his fork which made it impossible to merge his changes to the official repo or vice versa.
  14. Ok, so you're very likely trolling so I'm out. If you're actually having a problem, this is a case of PEBKAC. The way you fix it is you take a step back, realize that you are misunderstanding how things work and what people have been telling you. With that understanding, re-read what you have been told. Everything you need is there.
  15. You have not provided any proof that Vortex *does* load stuff out of order. You refer to files in the wrong directory (quote: Go to "My Doicuments /My Games /Fallout 4" & see for yourself.) And you use a tool that clearly states it's in an early version to "prove" that the load order is wrong. Meaning: - We don't know if the order is actually wrong - If the order is wrong we don't know if it's the actual load order file containing the wrong order - If the order is wrong we don't know if it was Vortex that created it
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