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An update on Vortex development


Dark0ne

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In response to post #56544376.


acidzebra wrote:

Is he still going? I put him on ignore after it became clear he has no idea about what making mods for either Skyrim or Minecraft entails or why the internals of one game would be more complex than the other, he just wants his one-click toys and to hell with what anyone else wants, even the creators of those toys. What a great member of the 'community'.


*shrug* Empty people preach empty words. Let him do his kiddie crusade, ain't like that would suddenly change Dark0ne's mind.
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Is he still going? I put him on ignore after it became clear he has no idea about what making mods for either Skyrim or Minecraft entails or why the internals of one game would be more complex than the other, he just wants his one-click toys and to hell with what anyone else wants, even the creators of those toys. What a great member of the 'community'.

O.o Ignored cause I disagree? Wow. Minecraft is actually more complex to mod than Skyrim. For example, in order to mod the game you need an API like forge (And that is just one of many you can use). Without forge you needed to actually go into the games jar files and add to that. Obviously, it's never a good way to mod a game by directly changing game files. When you have forge, you end up with a mod directory and you essentially just place all your mods into that directory. Seems simple at first, but forge has many version and so does minecraft. You need to make sure you Minecraft client, forge api, and mods all match. But that is not all, as most mods create recipies to create their items and those recipies can conflict with each other. So that means if you want two mods to work together that have the same recipe, you need to create your own to overwrite one of them. A lot of these mods also add a lot more to the game mechanic wise than any mod adds to Skyrim. This means very often the balance would be a total mess if you didn't mod your game well. Not to mention you could also have 2- 4 different types of the same ore in the world generating because many mods add their own varients of ores.

 

There, of course, is ways to eliminate this through configs. Altering loot tables requires a bit of scripting usually. Seriously. Considering I mod both Minecraft and Skyrim. I can assure you Minecraft is a lot tougher. This is actually probably why mod packs were more easily accepted because it was practically a requirement for people to enjoy modded.

 

Also, you make it sound like I am the one not listening to what people want, which makes very little sense. I am not the one arguing against a feature many people want. You are. It's not like it's even a feature you have to use yourself. All you are doing is arguing against something you yourself would not use. Why? What is the point?

Edited by Brabbit1987
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In response to post #56544376.

 

 

 

acidzebra wrote:

Is he still going? I put him on ignore after it became clear he has no idea about what making mods for either Skyrim or Minecraft entails or why the internals of one game would be more complex than the other, he just wants his one-click toys and to hell with what anyone else wants, even the creators of those toys. What a great member of the 'community'.

*shrug* Empty people preach empty words. Let him do his kiddie crusade, ain't like that would suddenly change Dark0ne's mind.

 

You need to grow up. There is no need to be so dang rude. But we know the Nexus real well. Mod authors can be rude and insult others without any repercussions. (I bet I am the one to get banned though cause I insulted him in a report, who wants to place bets? XD, he is allowed to call me empty but I am likely the one who is going to get in trouble, cause I am not a mod author.)

 

Honestly, this is getting irritating. No one has a single valid reason to be against this idea. It's just none stop .... whining by people who don't understand the value of making something easier to use and because THEY personally don't see it's value then it shouldn't exist at all. You have people who want to make things easier as a whole for the entire community and for whatever reason they are the ones seen as the bad people. Seriously, what the hell is wrong with people these days?

 

This is entirely possible, it's been done, so let's freaking do it. I don't see any reason not to. Why are we stunting the growth of Nexus because of a few people who are too damned elitist to want to make it easier for others?

People also seem to forget the nexus is a mod site for many games. This is a system that would be beneficial to have across the board. There is no negative to having a mod list system.

Edited by Brabbit1987
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In response to post #56517236.


Brabbit1987 wrote:

 

In response to post #56492581.


Brabbit1987 wrote:

Your argument is that people have different tastes like as if that makes mod packs not a good idea. it's a terrible argument because people enjoy games every single day that may not necessarly have everything exactly to their tastes. It's still fun regardless to msot people even if not every single portion is perfect.

Your argument shows a major lack in understanding even about mod packs. I am guessing you never actualyl tried a mod pack before for any game. I am guessing you didn't even do a single amount of research on the matter. You decided it was a bad idea based on your own ignorance. You disregard the fact mod packs exist and are successful in other games. For example Minecraft.

How is it that mod packs for Minecraft is the msot popular way to mod? If your conclusions here were correct, this would not be the case.
I don't thin kyou realize what people are willing to sacrifice for ease of use. People don't care if things are not exactly to their tastes if it means saving several days and headaches of trying to get a load order to work which they may never acocmplish when they could just download a mod pack that works right out of the box and just get to playing. So, there is a house they may not use. Who cares. So they may not use iNeed. Who cares.

I would argue they are more likely to try out more mods because it's easier to do. Sure it will be in the form of mod packs, but they are likely to come across mods they may have other wise never found because they would have never spent the time to do so.

I really wish someone against mod packs would actually provide a good argument, but it seems no one who is against it is capable of doing research on the matter and rather present their own ignorance to the world like as if it was something to show off as a trophy.

In response to post #56088421. #56101751, #56306091, #56315431, #56327811 are all replies on the same post.


FalloutNewb wrote: Well if it's made as easy as possible then the modding elitists don't have a single thing up on anybody.

IMO they're the type of people whose only talent is organizing load orders.
Ultros7 wrote: Modpacks are a good idea and would vastly improve the accessibility of modding Skyrim.

The compatibility issues that would arise aren't a good argument against it simply because that work would fall on modpack authors, they'd have to sort all of that out including their own patches if necessary, then the end user can just install it. It's better than the current system of having every single end user go through the nightmare of getting a stable load order, it's the one thing preventing people from getting into modded Skyrim. You have no idea how many people I've seen who just play vanilla or only use texture/ENB mods because they'd rather not deal with the hassle.
The best "install guides" out there like STEP are still too complicated for most people, and too time consuming. A real infrastructure on a mod client to automate the biggest chunks of the process, or ANY of it at all, would be greatly welcome.

This pushback against progress is not healthy, and I hope whatever's driving people to be selfish and/or elitist like this fades out eventually. If it doesn't, well you're going to have competitors rising up and no amount of bitching about people "stealing mods" will stop them.
Users want the most convenient way of doing things, if it exists they'll go for it and if it doesn't exist someone will be motivated to create it. You either move with the times or get left behind.
Brabbit1987 wrote: +Behelit79
It's not about being lazy, it's about ease of use. Not everyone has the time to create extensive load orders checking for problems and such reading through tons of documentation just to make sure one mod is compatible with another,

Yes, you are right people who download these packs are unlikely to read any documentation, but that is fine because that is meant to be done by the pack creator. The best example I can show of such a system like this working is for Minecraft. They have been literally doing it for years. Curse Forge. Keeping in mind Minecraft is far more difficult to mod than Skyrim is and the system works absolutely fine.
Behelit79 wrote: Don't know, all this "modpack" thing seems to me just an extreme lazy feat. No offense but there is already an horde of people that doesn't even read mod descriptions, give them a list with just direct download links and they wouldn't even visit the mods pages anymore.tajetaje wrote: OK, this is kind of a repost/summation of all the "modpack" comments so far but here it goes:
It seems that the most functional application of this idea is to have a simple text file or the like, formatted so that vortex can read it, with direct download links that could simply be fed into vortex's download manager. A simple handler for mods that have been removed is all that might be required to address the problem of pulled mods. I, as a semi-decent programmer, see no issue with this whatsoever, nor a rule conflict present.

Modpacks may seem a good idea but no, they aren't. So you all simply just tell me that you want your game based on preferences of another player? Really? I'll show you just a few simple examples: Mod Package Author choose just a single house mod, you blindly donwload its pack as it is, not knowing there are many alternatives and not even caring to search something that would better suit your taste. Mod Package Author 1 choose Realistic Needs and Diseases as a base for its realism gameplay, you download its pack and would not know there is iNeed as a great alternative; Mod Package Author 2 has iNeed in its pack but it lacks others, what would you do? There are countless grass mods, many weather mods and these are the simplest outcomes, when you start to throw in complex gameplay mods there would be many more variables. It's not a matter of not wanting to help people get their life easier, it's a matter to let you know that maybe there are better mods you would enjoy more.

""""People don't care if things are not exactly to their tastes if it means saving several days and headaches of trying to get a load order to work which they may never acocmplish when they could just download a mod pack that works right out of the box and just get to playing. """"

... well I do care. I would not like to download a mod pack which is coming with a mod that I do not like at all. I do choose, one by one, the mods that I want to use in my game play and I really do not care about how long it takes for me to download / install it. There are thousands of mods but not all of them are good mods and not all of them are of my taste. With all respect to whoever made that mod, for example, for me, the mod Better Mama Murphy chair is not a mod that I will install ever and if this mod would be included in a mod pack, I would not download / install that mod pack.

What I really do care about VORTEX is to allow us to :
- Sort automatically our load order to the best possible order
- Do what LOOT does automatically
- Be able to delete / add a mod mid game without affecting the game so we would not have any CTD
- Have different profiles so we can switch from one to another in our own game without affecting any performance
- Automatically update mods
- .... this is something that probably would not be possible but I would love that Vortex be able to resolve mod conflicts ... yes, this is probably not possible but again, it is something I would love Vortex to have ... or .... give some very good tutorial ( that explain to me step by step all the details ) about how to resolve mod conflicts using FO4Edit and I will be happy to learn and apply it in my game.

Back to mod pack ... again, I do not like that idea my friend but I do respect yours. I am very specific of what I want in my game and I am very demanding about mods. Just to give you an idea, I only have 70 mods in my FO4 game because for me, quality mods are much better than quantity, so if mod packs are about quantity, it is something not for me. I do not like that idea at all but if they have it as an optional feature, by all means, it is welcome so it will help some other players that love that idea.

 

You caring doesn't mean they should not include the option. All that means is you just don't use it. You continue to mod the way you want to. It doesn't hurt to include more options though.

 

 

In response to post #56499046.


ErusPrime wrote:

In response to post #56492581.


Brabbit1987 wrote:

Your argument is that people have different tastes like as if that makes mod packs not a good idea. it's a terrible argument because people enjoy games every single day that may not necessarly have everything exactly to their tastes. It's still fun regardless to msot people even if not every single portion is perfect.

Your argument shows a major lack in understanding even about mod packs. I am guessing you never actualyl tried a mod pack before for any game. I am guessing you didn't even do a single amount of research on the matter. You decided it was a bad idea based on your own ignorance. You disregard the fact mod packs exist and are successful in other games. For example Minecraft.

How is it that mod packs for Minecraft is the msot popular way to mod? If your conclusions here were correct, this would not be the case.
I don't thin kyou realize what people are willing to sacrifice for ease of use. People don't care if things are not exactly to their tastes if it means saving several days and headaches of trying to get a load order to work which they may never acocmplish when they could just download a mod pack that works right out of the box and just get to playing. So, there is a house they may not use. Who cares. So they may not use iNeed. Who cares.

I would argue they are more likely to try out more mods because it's easier to do. Sure it will be in the form of mod packs, but they are likely to come across mods they may have other wise never found because they would have never spent the time to do so.

I really wish someone against mod packs would actually provide a good argument, but it seems no one who is against it is capable of doing research on the matter and rather present their own ignorance to the world like as if it was something to show off as a trophy.

In response to post #56088421. #56101751, #56306091, #56315431, #56327811 are all replies on the same post.


FalloutNewb wrote: Well if it's made as easy as possible then the modding elitists don't have a single thing up on anybody.

IMO they're the type of people whose only talent is organizing load orders.
Ultros7 wrote: Modpacks are a good idea and would vastly improve the accessibility of modding Skyrim.

The compatibility issues that would arise aren't a good argument against it simply because that work would fall on modpack authors, they'd have to sort all of that out including their own patches if necessary, then the end user can just install it. It's better than the current system of having every single end user go through the nightmare of getting a stable load order, it's the one thing preventing people from getting into modded Skyrim. You have no idea how many people I've seen who just play vanilla or only use texture/ENB mods because they'd rather not deal with the hassle.
The best "install guides" out there like STEP are still too complicated for most people, and too time consuming. A real infrastructure on a mod client to automate the biggest chunks of the process, or ANY of it at all, would be greatly welcome.

This pushback against progress is not healthy, and I hope whatever's driving people to be selfish and/or elitist like this fades out eventually. If it doesn't, well you're going to have competitors rising up and no amount of bitching about people "stealing mods" will stop them.
Users want the most convenient way of doing things, if it exists they'll go for it and if it doesn't exist someone will be motivated to create it. You either move with the times or get left behind.
Brabbit1987 wrote: +Behelit79
It's not about being lazy, it's about ease of use. Not everyone has the time to create extensive load orders checking for problems and such reading through tons of documentation just to make sure one mod is compatible with another,

Yes, you are right people who download these packs are unlikely to read any documentation, but that is fine because that is meant to be done by the pack creator. The best example I can show of such a system like this working is for Minecraft. They have been literally doing it for years. Curse Forge. Keeping in mind Minecraft is far more difficult to mod than Skyrim is and the system works absolutely fine.
Behelit79 wrote: Don't know, all this "modpack" thing seems to me just an extreme lazy feat. No offense but there is already an horde of people that doesn't even read mod descriptions, give them a list with just direct download links and they wouldn't even visit the mods pages anymore.tajetaje wrote: OK, this is kind of a repost/summation of all the "modpack" comments so far but here it goes:
It seems that the most functional application of this idea is to have a simple text file or the like, formatted so that vortex can read it, with direct download links that could simply be fed into vortex's download manager. A simple handler for mods that have been removed is all that might be required to address the problem of pulled mods. I, as a semi-decent programmer, see no issue with this whatsoever, nor a rule conflict present.

Modpacks may seem a good idea but no, they aren't. So you all simply just tell me that you want your game based on preferences of another player? Really? I'll show you just a few simple examples: Mod Package Author choose just a single house mod, you blindly donwload its pack as it is, not knowing there are many alternatives and not even caring to search something that would better suit your taste. Mod Package Author 1 choose Realistic Needs and Diseases as a base for its realism gameplay, you download its pack and would not know there is iNeed as a great alternative; Mod Package Author 2 has iNeed in its pack but it lacks others, what would you do? There are countless grass mods, many weather mods and these are the simplest outcomes, when you start to throw in complex gameplay mods there would be many more variables. It's not a matter of not wanting to help people get their life easier, it's a matter to let you know that maybe there are better mods you would enjoy more.

""""People don't care if things are not exactly to their tastes if it means saving several days and headaches of trying to get a load order to work which they may never acocmplish when they could just download a mod pack that works right out of the box and just get to playing. """"

... well I do care. I would not like to download a mod pack which is coming with a mod that I do not like at all. I do choose, one by one, the mods that I want to use in my game play and I really do not care about how long it takes for me to download / install it. There are thousands of mods but not all of them are good mods and not all of them are of my taste. With all respect to whoever made that mod, for example, for me, the mod Better Mama Murphy chair is not a mod that I will install ever and if this mod would be included in a mod pack, I would not download / install that mod pack.

What I really do care about VORTEX is to allow us to :
- Sort automatically our load order to the best possible order
- Do what LOOT does automatically
- Be able to delete / add a mod mid game without affecting the game so we would not have any CTD
- Have different profiles so we can switch from one to another in our own game without affecting any performance
- Automatically update mods
- .... this is something that probably would not be possible but I would love that Vortex be able to resolve mod conflicts ... yes, this is probably not possible but again, it is something I would love Vortex to have ... or .... give some very good tutorial ( that explain to me step by step all the details ) about how to resolve mod conflicts using FO4Edit and I will be happy to learn and apply it in my game.

Back to mod pack ... again, I do not like that idea my friend but I do respect yours. I am very specific of what I want in my game and I am very demanding about mods. Just to give you an idea, I only have 70 mods in my FO4 game because for me, quality mods are much better than quantity, so if mod packs are about quantity, it is something not for me. I do not like that idea at all but if they have it as an optional feature, by all means, it is welcome so it will help some other players that love that idea.

In response to post #56088421. #56101751, #56306091, #56315431, #56327811 are all replies on the same post.


FalloutNewb wrote: Well if it's made as easy as possible then the modding elitists don't have a single thing up on anybody.

IMO they're the type of people whose only talent is organizing load orders.
Ultros7 wrote: Modpacks are a good idea and would vastly improve the accessibility of modding Skyrim.

The compatibility issues that would arise aren't a good argument against it simply because that work would fall on modpack authors, they'd have to sort all of that out including their own patches if necessary, then the end user can just install it. It's better than the current system of having every single end user go through the nightmare of getting a stable load order, it's the one thing preventing people from getting into modded Skyrim. You have no idea how many people I've seen who just play vanilla or only use texture/ENB mods because they'd rather not deal with the hassle.
The best "install guides" out there like STEP are still too complicated for most people, and too time consuming. A real infrastructure on a mod client to automate the biggest chunks of the process, or ANY of it at all, would be greatly welcome.

This pushback against progress is not healthy, and I hope whatever's driving people to be selfish and/or elitist like this fades out eventually. If it doesn't, well you're going to have competitors rising up and no amount of bitching about people "stealing mods" will stop them.
Users want the most convenient way of doing things, if it exists they'll go for it and if it doesn't exist someone will be motivated to create it. You either move with the times or get left behind.
Brabbit1987 wrote: +Behelit79
It's not about being lazy, it's about ease of use. Not everyone has the time to create extensive load orders checking for problems and such reading through tons of documentation just to make sure one mod is compatible with another,

Yes, you are right people who download these packs are unlikely to read any documentation, but that is fine because that is meant to be done by the pack creator. The best example I can show of such a system like this working is for Minecraft. They have been literally doing it for years. Curse Forge. Keeping in mind Minecraft is far more difficult to mod than Skyrim is and the system works absolutely fine.
Behelit79 wrote: Don't know, all this "modpack" thing seems to me just an extreme lazy feat. No offense but there is already an horde of people that doesn't even read mod descriptions, give them a list with just direct download links and they wouldn't even visit the mods pages anymore.tajetaje wrote: OK, this is kind of a repost/summation of all the "modpack" comments so far but here it goes:
It seems that the most functional application of this idea is to have a simple text file or the like, formatted so that vortex can read it, with direct download links that could simply be fed into vortex's download manager. A simple handler for mods that have been removed is all that might be required to address the problem of pulled mods. I, as a semi-decent programmer, see no issue with this whatsoever, nor a rule conflict present.

Modpacks may seem a good idea but no, they aren't. So you all simply just tell me that you want your game based on preferences of another player? Really? I'll show you just a few simple examples: Mod Package Author choose just a single house mod, you blindly donwload its pack as it is, not knowing there are many alternatives and not even caring to search something that would better suit your taste. Mod Package Author 1 choose Realistic Needs and Diseases as a base for its realism gameplay, you download its pack and would not know there is iNeed as a great alternative; Mod Package Author 2 has iNeed in its pack but it lacks others, what would you do? There are countless grass mods, many weather mods and these are the simplest outcomes, when you start to throw in complex gameplay mods there would be many more variables. It's not a matter of not wanting to help people get their life easier, it's a matter to let you know that maybe there are better mods you would enjoy more.

I don't understand the argument against a system that only adds functionality. Literally nothing is being taken away. Your ability to play with whatever mods you want is still there. The only thing that changes is now you can spend all that time and share it with other people without breaking the rules. Because I guarantee there are a lot of people who have put their files on a jump drive and installed their mod setup for someone else. Because 20 minutes of that vs. hours/days/weeks of walking them through the process is f***ing stupid when we absolutely have the technology to allow it through controllable channels.

Learn to use a spoiler, it won't bite you.

Here is why modpacks are not going to happen anytime soon, if ever.

 

Ya, you should probably read further down on the reddit before acting like you are right.

In plus, I have to disagree with a lot of what Dark0ne even said. There are quite a few ways to go about this.
Here is one of the ways that I personally think is the best and takes care of all the problems. I am going to call it a mod list btw, instead of a mod pack to eliminate confusion.

1. When a mod is included in a mod list and the author deletes the version, it will send a notification to the author of the mod list to let them know. This will help list authors keep their list up to date.
2. When a user downloads a list, if one of the versions is deleted for the mod it needs, ti will pop up a notification. This will give the person the option to exclude the mod, or download the new version. This way a person is more aware of which mods this occurs for and they can double check themselves that the new version will not cause problems. Or if it will, they can decide to just not download it. These two options would work for most cases.

Now as for mod authors having issues with people not visiting their page when mod lists are involved, I feel that is entirely unnecessary anyway. If a person runs into a problem they are likely to either go to the list authors page or the specific mod that is causing the issue. If they go to the list author, they are likely to refer them to the mod page or they may even be able to help without sending them to the mod page. Maybe they know the problem. This also in a sense can eliminate a lot of the smaller issues that occur and lighten the load a bit for mod authors.

Not to mention when you download a decent pack it's more likely to work than if the person tried to make their own and failed. Which means again mod authors have less to deal with. People not visiting their page isn't a good excuse because the only time people need to do that is if they are the ones putting together the pack, or if a person runs into a problem which they will absolutely be referred to the correct page if need be by the list authors. Also, the list should include links to all the mods pages in the description.

It's honestly not nearly as complicated as Dark0ne wrote in that post.


"""You caring doesn't mean they should not include the option. All that means is you just don't use it. You continue to mod the way you want to. It doesn't hurt to include more options though."""

... apparently you did not read my entire entry because at the end of it I said that if "they have it ( mod pack ) as an optional feature, I will welcome the idea so it will help other people" .... so ... maybe you understand it with different words : I do not care about mod packs at all and I do not think I will never download / install them ... BUT ... if they exist, so be it, other will benefit from it. I hope that you read my entire post so you can understand my point.
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In response to post #56544376. #56544626 is also a reply to the same post.


acidzebra wrote:

Is he still going? I put him on ignore after it became clear he has no idea about what making mods for either Skyrim or Minecraft entails or why the internals of one game would be more complex than the other, he just wants his one-click toys and to hell with what anyone else wants, even the creators of those toys. What a great member of the 'community'.

Ethreon wrote: *shrug* Empty people preach empty words. Let him do his kiddie crusade, ain't like that would suddenly change Dark0ne's mind.


In his holy crusade he is so blind to think he has the only, universal, truth. You can show him practical, and even simple, examples related to this very specific game modding mechanics (an infinity of multiple choices always bound to an overriding/merging system) and he will answer taking in account other games. Well, what else to say? The holy crusader doesn't understand that, if devs implement a modpacks support system, it would change 0 in my, yours, and many others Skyrim modding/gaming experience so i really hope they will do it, even just for not reading any more nonsense. Edited by Behelit79
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In response to post #56544376. #56544626 is also a reply to the same post.

 

 

 

acidzebra wrote:

Is he still going? I put him on ignore after it became clear he has no idea about what making mods for either Skyrim or Minecraft entails or why the internals of one game would be more complex than the other, he just wants his one-click toys and to hell with what anyone else wants, even the creators of those toys. What a great member of the 'community'.

Ethreon wrote: *shrug* Empty people preach empty words. Let him do his kiddie crusade, ain't like that would suddenly change Dark0ne's mind.

In his holy crusade he is so blind to think he has the only, universal, truth. You can show him practical, and even simple, examples related to this very specific game modding mechanics (an infinity of multiple choices always bound to an overriding/merging system) and he will answer taking in account other games. Well, what else to say? The holy crusader doesn't understand that, if devs implement a modpacks support system, it would change 0 in my, yours, and many others Skyrim modding/gaming experience so i really hope they will do it, even just for not reading any more nonsense.

 

 

I feel like you're being a dick to the people that agree with you. but just to clarify: the discussion isn't about creating mods. It's about applying them. Any collection of mods that work together to form a playable game through the current method can be automated. We have the client and the CDN. Hell, make it a premium feature and I guarantee I'll pay for it. I mean if there's gonna be this much back and forth why not add money to the mix? If they add this as a premium feature they will see a rise in subscriptions and site traffic. More page views for authors. More dollars for nexus. And nothing changes about the old system. I see no actual downside to his described system beyond the logistics. And that's kinda the point of logistics. To figure it out.

 

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In response to post #56517236.

 

 

 

Brabbit1987 wrote:

You caring doesn't mean they should not include the option. All that means is you just don't use it. You continue to mod the way you want to. It doesn't hurt to include more options though.

In response to post #56492581.

 

 

 

Brabbit1987 wrote:

Your argument is that people have different tastes like as if that makes mod packs not a good idea. it's a terrible argument because people enjoy games every single day that may not necessarly have everything exactly to their tastes. It's still fun regardless to msot people even if not every single portion is perfect.

 

Your argument shows a major lack in understanding even about mod packs. I am guessing you never actualyl tried a mod pack before for any game. I am guessing you didn't even do a single amount of research on the matter. You decided it was a bad idea based on your own ignorance. You disregard the fact mod packs exist and are successful in other games. For example Minecraft.

 

How is it that mod packs for Minecraft is the msot popular way to mod? If your conclusions here were correct, this would not be the case.

I don't thin kyou realize what people are willing to sacrifice for ease of use. People don't care if things are not exactly to their tastes if it means saving several days and headaches of trying to get a load order to work which they may never acocmplish when they could just download a mod pack that works right out of the box and just get to playing. So, there is a house they may not use. Who cares. So they may not use iNeed. Who cares.

 

I would argue they are more likely to try out more mods because it's easier to do. Sure it will be in the form of mod packs, but they are likely to come across mods they may have other wise never found because they would have never spent the time to do so.

 

I really wish someone against mod packs would actually provide a good argument, but it seems no one who is against it is capable of doing research on the matter and rather present their own ignorance to the world like as if it was something to show off as a trophy.

In response to post #56088421. #56101751, #56306091, #56315431, #56327811 are all replies on the same post.

 

 

 

FalloutNewb wrote: Well if it's made as easy as possible then the modding elitists don't have a single thing up on anybody.

 

IMO they're the type of people whose only talent is organizing load orders. Ultros7 wrote: Modpacks are a good idea and would vastly improve the accessibility of modding Skyrim.

 

The compatibility issues that would arise aren't a good argument against it simply because that work would fall on modpack authors, they'd have to sort all of that out including their own patches if necessary, then the end user can just install it. It's better than the current system of having every single end user go through the nightmare of getting a stable load order, it's the one thing preventing people from getting into modded Skyrim. You have no idea how many people I've seen who just play vanilla or only use texture/ENB mods because they'd rather not deal with the hassle.

The best "install guides" out there like STEP are still too complicated for most people, and too time consuming. A real infrastructure on a mod client to automate the biggest chunks of the process, or ANY of it at all, would be greatly welcome.

 

This pushback against progress is not healthy, and I hope whatever's driving people to be selfish and/or elitist like this fades out eventually. If it doesn't, well you're going to have competitors rising up and no amount of bitching about people "stealing mods" will stop them.

Users want the most convenient way of doing things, if it exists they'll go for it and if it doesn't exist someone will be motivated to create it. You either move with the times or get left behind.Brabbit1987 wrote: +Behelit79

It's not about being lazy, it's about ease of use. Not everyone has the time to create extensive load orders checking for problems and such reading through tons of documentation just to make sure one mod is compatible with another,

 

Yes, you are right people who download these packs are unlikely to read any documentation, but that is fine because that is meant to be done by the pack creator. The best example I can show of such a system like this working is for Minecraft. They have been literally doing it for years. Curse Forge. Keeping in mind Minecraft is far more difficult to mod than Skyrim is and the system works absolutely fine.Behelit79 wrote: Don't know, all this "modpack" thing seems to me just an extreme lazy feat. No offense but there is already an horde of people that doesn't even read mod descriptions, give them a list with just direct download links and they wouldn't even visit the mods pages anymore.tajetaje wrote: OK, this is kind of a repost/summation of all the "modpack" comments so far but here it goes:

It seems that the most functional application of this idea is to have a simple text file or the like, formatted so that vortex can read it, with direct download links that could simply be fed into vortex's download manager. A simple handler for mods that have been removed is all that might be required to address the problem of pulled mods. I, as a semi-decent programmer, see no issue with this whatsoever, nor a rule conflict present.

Modpacks may seem a good idea but no, they aren't. So you all simply just tell me that you want your game based on preferences of another player? Really? I'll show you just a few simple examples: Mod Package Author choose just a single house mod, you blindly donwload its pack as it is, not knowing there are many alternatives and not even caring to search something that would better suit your taste. Mod Package Author 1 choose Realistic Needs and Diseases as a base for its realism gameplay, you download its pack and would not know there is iNeed as a great alternative; Mod Package Author 2 has iNeed in its pack but it lacks others, what would you do? There are countless grass mods, many weather mods and these are the simplest outcomes, when you start to throw in complex gameplay mods there would be many more variables. It's not a matter of not wanting to help people get their life easier, it's a matter to let you know that maybe there are better mods you would enjoy more.

""""People don't care if things are not exactly to their tastes if it means saving several days and headaches of trying to get a load order to work which they may never acocmplish when they could just download a mod pack that works right out of the box and just get to playing. """"

 

... well I do care. I would not like to download a mod pack which is coming with a mod that I do not like at all. I do choose, one by one, the mods that I want to use in my game play and I really do not care about how long it takes for me to download / install it. There are thousands of mods but not all of them are good mods and not all of them are of my taste. With all respect to whoever made that mod, for example, for me, the mod Better Mama Murphy chair is not a mod that I will install ever and if this mod would be included in a mod pack, I would not download / install that mod pack.

 

What I really do care about VORTEX is to allow us to :

- Sort automatically our load order to the best possible order

- Do what LOOT does automatically

- Be able to delete / add a mod mid game without affecting the game so we would not have any CTD

- Have different profiles so we can switch from one to another in our own game without affecting any performance

- Automatically update mods

- .... this is something that probably would not be possible but I would love that Vortex be able to resolve mod conflicts ... yes, this is probably not possible but again, it is something I would love Vortex to have ... or .... give some very good tutorial ( that explain to me step by step all the details ) about how to resolve mod conflicts using FO4Edit and I will be happy to learn and apply it in my game.

 

Back to mod pack ... again, I do not like that idea my friend but I do respect yours. I am very specific of what I want in my game and I am very demanding about mods. Just to give you an idea, I only have 70 mods in my FO4 game because for me, quality mods are much better than quantity, so if mod packs are about quantity, it is something not for me. I do not like that idea at all but if they have it as an optional feature, by all means, it is welcome so it will help some other players that love that idea.

Ya, you should probably read further down on the reddit before acting like you are right.

 

In plus, I have to disagree with a lot of what Dark0ne even said. There are quite a few ways to go about this.

Here is one of the ways that I personally think is the best and takes care of all the problems. I am going to call it a mod list btw, instead of a mod pack to eliminate confusion.

 

1. When a mod is included in a mod list and the author deletes the version, it will send a notification to the author of the mod list to let them know. This will help list authors keep their list up to date.

2. When a user downloads a list, if one of the versions is deleted for the mod it needs, ti will pop up a notification. This will give the person the option to exclude the mod, or download the new version. This way a person is more aware of which mods this occurs for and they can double check themselves that the new version will not cause problems. Or if it will, they can decide to just not download it. These two options would work for most cases.

 

Now as for mod authors having issues with people not visiting their page when mod lists are involved, I feel that is entirely unnecessary anyway. If a person runs into a problem they are likely to either go to the list authors page or the specific mod that is causing the issue. If they go to the list author, they are likely to refer them to the mod page or they may even be able to help without sending them to the mod page. Maybe they know the problem. This also in a sense can eliminate a lot of the smaller issues that occur and lighten the load a bit for mod authors.

 

Not to mention when you download a decent pack it's more likely to work than if the person tried to make their own and failed. Which means again mod authors have less to deal with. People not visiting their page isn't a good excuse because the only time people need to do that is if they are the ones putting together the pack, or if a person runs into a problem which they will absolutely be referred to the correct page if need be by the list authors. Also, the list should include links to all the mods pages in the description.

 

It's honestly not nearly as complicated as Dark0ne wrote in that post.

In response to post #56499046.

 

 

 

ErusPrime wrote:

In response to post #56492581.

 

 

 

Brabbit1987 wrote:

Your argument is that people have different tastes like as if that makes mod packs not a good idea. it's a terrible argument because people enjoy games every single day that may not necessarly have everything exactly to their tastes. It's still fun regardless to msot people even if not every single portion is perfect.

 

Your argument shows a major lack in understanding even about mod packs. I am guessing you never actualyl tried a mod pack before for any game. I am guessing you didn't even do a single amount of research on the matter. You decided it was a bad idea based on your own ignorance. You disregard the fact mod packs exist and are successful in other games. For example Minecraft.

 

How is it that mod packs for Minecraft is the msot popular way to mod? If your conclusions here were correct, this would not be the case.

I don't thin kyou realize what people are willing to sacrifice for ease of use. People don't care if things are not exactly to their tastes if it means saving several days and headaches of trying to get a load order to work which they may never acocmplish when they could just download a mod pack that works right out of the box and just get to playing. So, there is a house they may not use. Who cares. So they may not use iNeed. Who cares.

 

I would argue they are more likely to try out more mods because it's easier to do. Sure it will be in the form of mod packs, but they are likely to come across mods they may have other wise never found because they would have never spent the time to do so.

 

I really wish someone against mod packs would actually provide a good argument, but it seems no one who is against it is capable of doing research on the matter and rather present their own ignorance to the world like as if it was something to show off as a trophy.

In response to post #56088421. #56101751, #56306091, #56315431, #56327811 are all replies on the same post.

 

 

 

FalloutNewb wrote: Well if it's made as easy as possible then the modding elitists don't have a single thing up on anybody.

 

IMO they're the type of people whose only talent is organizing load orders. Ultros7 wrote: Modpacks are a good idea and would vastly improve the accessibility of modding Skyrim.

 

The compatibility issues that would arise aren't a good argument against it simply because that work would fall on modpack authors, they'd have to sort all of that out including their own patches if necessary, then the end user can just install it. It's better than the current system of having every single end user go through the nightmare of getting a stable load order, it's the one thing preventing people from getting into modded Skyrim. You have no idea how many people I've seen who just play vanilla or only use texture/ENB mods because they'd rather not deal with the hassle.

The best "install guides" out there like STEP are still too complicated for most people, and too time consuming. A real infrastructure on a mod client to automate the biggest chunks of the process, or ANY of it at all, would be greatly welcome.

 

This pushback against progress is not healthy, and I hope whatever's driving people to be selfish and/or elitist like this fades out eventually. If it doesn't, well you're going to have competitors rising up and no amount of bitching about people "stealing mods" will stop them.

Users want the most convenient way of doing things, if it exists they'll go for it and if it doesn't exist someone will be motivated to create it. You either move with the times or get left behind.Brabbit1987 wrote: +Behelit79

It's not about being lazy, it's about ease of use. Not everyone has the time to create extensive load orders checking for problems and such reading through tons of documentation just to make sure one mod is compatible with another,

 

Yes, you are right people who download these packs are unlikely to read any documentation, but that is fine because that is meant to be done by the pack creator. The best example I can show of such a system like this working is for Minecraft. They have been literally doing it for years. Curse Forge. Keeping in mind Minecraft is far more difficult to mod than Skyrim is and the system works absolutely fine.Behelit79 wrote: Don't know, all this "modpack" thing seems to me just an extreme lazy feat. No offense but there is already an horde of people that doesn't even read mod descriptions, give them a list with just direct download links and they wouldn't even visit the mods pages anymore.tajetaje wrote: OK, this is kind of a repost/summation of all the "modpack" comments so far but here it goes:

It seems that the most functional application of this idea is to have a simple text file or the like, formatted so that vortex can read it, with direct download links that could simply be fed into vortex's download manager. A simple handler for mods that have been removed is all that might be required to address the problem of pulled mods. I, as a semi-decent programmer, see no issue with this whatsoever, nor a rule conflict present.

Modpacks may seem a good idea but no, they aren't. So you all simply just tell me that you want your game based on preferences of another player? Really? I'll show you just a few simple examples: Mod Package Author choose just a single house mod, you blindly donwload its pack as it is, not knowing there are many alternatives and not even caring to search something that would better suit your taste. Mod Package Author 1 choose Realistic Needs and Diseases as a base for its realism gameplay, you download its pack and would not know there is iNeed as a great alternative; Mod Package Author 2 has iNeed in its pack but it lacks others, what would you do? There are countless grass mods, many weather mods and these are the simplest outcomes, when you start to throw in complex gameplay mods there would be many more variables. It's not a matter of not wanting to help people get their life easier, it's a matter to let you know that maybe there are better mods you would enjoy more.

""""People don't care if things are not exactly to their tastes if it means saving several days and headaches of trying to get a load order to work which they may never acocmplish when they could just download a mod pack that works right out of the box and just get to playing. """"

 

... well I do care. I would not like to download a mod pack which is coming with a mod that I do not like at all. I do choose, one by one, the mods that I want to use in my game play and I really do not care about how long it takes for me to download / install it. There are thousands of mods but not all of them are good mods and not all of them are of my taste. With all respect to whoever made that mod, for example, for me, the mod Better Mama Murphy chair is not a mod that I will install ever and if this mod would be included in a mod pack, I would not download / install that mod pack.

 

What I really do care about VORTEX is to allow us to :

- Sort automatically our load order to the best possible order

- Do what LOOT does automatically

- Be able to delete / add a mod mid game without affecting the game so we would not have any CTD

- Have different profiles so we can switch from one to another in our own game without affecting any performance

- Automatically update mods

- .... this is something that probably would not be possible but I would love that Vortex be able to resolve mod conflicts ... yes, this is probably not possible but again, it is something I would love Vortex to have ... or .... give some very good tutorial ( that explain to me step by step all the details ) about how to resolve mod conflicts using FO4Edit and I will be happy to learn and apply it in my game.

 

Back to mod pack ... again, I do not like that idea my friend but I do respect yours. I am very specific of what I want in my game and I am very demanding about mods. Just to give you an idea, I only have 70 mods in my FO4 game because for me, quality mods are much better than quantity, so if mod packs are about quantity, it is something not for me. I do not like that idea at all but if they have it as an optional feature, by all means, it is welcome so it will help some other players that love that idea.

In response to post #56088421. #56101751, #56306091, #56315431, #56327811 are all replies on the same post.

 

 

 

FalloutNewb wrote: Well if it's made as easy as possible then the modding elitists don't have a single thing up on anybody.

 

IMO they're the type of people whose only talent is organizing load orders. Ultros7 wrote: Modpacks are a good idea and would vastly improve the accessibility of modding Skyrim.

 

The compatibility issues that would arise aren't a good argument against it simply because that work would fall on modpack authors, they'd have to sort all of that out including their own patches if necessary, then the end user can just install it. It's better than the current system of having every single end user go through the nightmare of getting a stable load order, it's the one thing preventing people from getting into modded Skyrim. You have no idea how many people I've seen who just play vanilla or only use texture/ENB mods because they'd rather not deal with the hassle.

The best "install guides" out there like STEP are still too complicated for most people, and too time consuming. A real infrastructure on a mod client to automate the biggest chunks of the process, or ANY of it at all, would be greatly welcome.

 

This pushback against progress is not healthy, and I hope whatever's driving people to be selfish and/or elitist like this fades out eventually. If it doesn't, well you're going to have competitors rising up and no amount of bitching about people "stealing mods" will stop them.

Users want the most convenient way of doing things, if it exists they'll go for it and if it doesn't exist someone will be motivated to create it. You either move with the times or get left behind.Brabbit1987 wrote: +Behelit79

It's not about being lazy, it's about ease of use. Not everyone has the time to create extensive load orders checking for problems and such reading through tons of documentation just to make sure one mod is compatible with another,

 

Yes, you are right people who download these packs are unlikely to read any documentation, but that is fine because that is meant to be done by the pack creator. The best example I can show of such a system like this working is for Minecraft. They have been literally doing it for years. Curse Forge. Keeping in mind Minecraft is far more difficult to mod than Skyrim is and the system works absolutely fine.Behelit79 wrote: Don't know, all this "modpack" thing seems to me just an extreme lazy feat. No offense but there is already an horde of people that doesn't even read mod descriptions, give them a list with just direct download links and they wouldn't even visit the mods pages anymore.tajetaje wrote: OK, this is kind of a repost/summation of all the "modpack" comments so far but here it goes:

It seems that the most functional application of this idea is to have a simple text file or the like, formatted so that vortex can read it, with direct download links that could simply be fed into vortex's download manager. A simple handler for mods that have been removed is all that might be required to address the problem of pulled mods. I, as a semi-decent programmer, see no issue with this whatsoever, nor a rule conflict present.

Modpacks may seem a good idea but no, they aren't. So you all simply just tell me that you want your game based on preferences of another player? Really? I'll show you just a few simple examples: Mod Package Author choose just a single house mod, you blindly donwload its pack as it is, not knowing there are many alternatives and not even caring to search something that would better suit your taste. Mod Package Author 1 choose Realistic Needs and Diseases as a base for its realism gameplay, you download its pack and would not know there is iNeed as a great alternative; Mod Package Author 2 has iNeed in its pack but it lacks others, what would you do? There are countless grass mods, many weather mods and these are the simplest outcomes, when you start to throw in complex gameplay mods there would be many more variables. It's not a matter of not wanting to help people get their life easier, it's a matter to let you know that maybe there are better mods you would enjoy more.

I don't understand the argument against a system that only adds functionality. Literally nothing is being taken away. Your ability to play with whatever mods you want is still there. The only thing that changes is now you can spend all that time and share it with other people without breaking the rules. Because I guarantee there are a lot of people who have put their files on a jump drive and installed their mod setup for someone else. Because 20 minutes of that vs. hours/days/weeks of walking them through the process is f***ing stupid when we absolutely have the technology to allow it through controllable channels.

Learn to use a spoiler, it won't bite you.

 

Here is why modpacks are not going to happen anytime soon, if ever.

"""You caring doesn't mean they should not include the option. All that means is you just don't use it. You continue to mod the way you want to. It doesn't hurt to include more options though."""

 

... apparently you did not read my entire entry because at the end of it I said that if "they have it ( mod pack ) as an optional feature, I will welcome the idea so it will help other people" .... so ... maybe you understand it with different words : I do not care about mod packs at all and I do not think I will never download / install them ... BUT ... if they exist, so be it, other will benefit from it. I hope that you read my entire post so you can understand my point.

 

I read your post just fine, thank you. If you don't care either way, why are you arguing with me then? It's normal for a person to refute another person's points in a debate and that was what I was doing. Your actions speak louder than your words. If you truly do not care, then there is nothing to argue about and yet, here you are.

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In response to post #56544376. #56544626 is also a reply to the same post.

 

 

 

acidzebra wrote:

Is he still going? I put him on ignore after it became clear he has no idea about what making mods for either Skyrim or Minecraft entails or why the internals of one game would be more complex than the other, he just wants his one-click toys and to hell with what anyone else wants, even the creators of those toys. What a great member of the 'community'.

Ethreon wrote: *shrug* Empty people preach empty words. Let him do his kiddie crusade, ain't like that would suddenly change Dark0ne's mind.

In his holy crusade he is so blind to think he has the only, universal, truth. You can show him practical, and even simple, examples related to this very specific game modding mechanics (an infinity of multiple choices always bound to an overriding/merging system) and he will answer taking in account other games. Well, what else to say? The holy crusader doesn't understand that, if devs implement a modpacks support system, it would change 0 in my, yours, and many others Skyrim modding/gaming experience so i really hope they will do it, even just for not reading any more nonsense.

 

It has nothing to do with a universal truth. It's just a matter of common sense. I explained that not everyone cares so much about getting things perfectly the way they want them if it means being able to jump in the game a lot quicker.

 

Plus you get to try out new experiences you may not have thought of yourself. How do you know you don't like something till you try it ... right? That's one of the best things about Modded Minecraft. The experience you get from each mod pack can be vastly different. Something you will find is that some people go pretty far and create a pack that incorporates the mods so well together that unless you wanted to spend months doing that yourself, you would have never had that experience. Maybe even a mod developer wants to create a pack and make a mod specific to that pack in Skyrim to do the same sort of thing.

 

At the pack level, things can get very creative when you are trying to peice it all together. A good mod pack developer doesn't just throw everything together and call it a day. They go through extensive testing, balancing, making changes, fixing bugs, sometimes even developing mods themselves to include things that they might not be able to get elsewhere for what they want to do or to try and unify all the mods in a seamless expereince.

 

Also, you are another person who says they don't care if we get the feature. Why do you argue against people who want the feature then if you don't care?

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In response to post #56561296.


Brabbit1987 wrote:

 

In response to post #56544376. #56544626 is also a reply to the same post.


acidzebra wrote:

Is he still going? I put him on ignore after it became clear he has no idea about what making mods for either Skyrim or Minecraft entails or why the internals of one game would be more complex than the other, he just wants his one-click toys and to hell with what anyone else wants, even the creators of those toys. What a great member of the 'community'.

Ethreon wrote: *shrug* Empty people preach empty words. Let him do his kiddie crusade, ain't like that would suddenly change Dark0ne's mind.

In his holy crusade he is so blind to think he has the only, universal, truth. You can show him practical, and even simple, examples related to this very specific game modding mechanics (an infinity of multiple choices always bound to an overriding/merging system) and he will answer taking in account other games. Well, what else to say? The holy crusader doesn't understand that, if devs implement a modpacks support system, it would change 0 in my, yours, and many others Skyrim modding/gaming experience so i really hope they will do it, even just for not reading any more nonsense.

 

It has nothing to do with a universal truth. It's just a matter of common sense. I explained that not everyone cares so much about getting things perfectly the way they want them if it means being able to jump in the game a lot quicker.

Plus you get to try out new experiences you may not have thought of yourself. How do you know you don't like something till you try it ... right? That's one of the best things about Modded Minecraft. The experience you get from each mod pack can be vastly different. Something you will find is that some people go pretty far and create a pack that incorporates the mods so well together that unless you wanted to spend months doing that yourself, you would have never had that experience. Maybe even a mod developer wants to create a pack and make a mod specific to that pack in Skyrim to do the same sort of thing.

At the pack level, things can get very creative when you are trying to peice it all together. A good mod pack developer doesn't just throw everything together and call it a day. They go through extensive testing, balancing, making changes, fixing bugs, sometimes even developing mods themselves to include things that they might not be able to get elsewhere for what they want to do or to try and unify all the mods in a seamless expereince.

Also, you are another person who says they don't care if we get the feature. Why do you argue against people who want the feature then if you don't care?


The only way looking at it from a skyrim/fallout perspective to provide a mod pack as I see it. Would be instead to provide a mod that was the merging of those other mods into one mega mod (not necessarily one esp/esm) then it would handle the dependency issue. (Which would probably not be a simple task)

Something that I can't imagine happening unless a bunch of authors got together to build a unifying experience. In which case I'm not sure i would actually call it a mod pack but a overhaul.

Which has happened before Mods like FWE and Project Nevada. (They are more than what i could call a mod pack but provide what in think your looking for in one)

Which would pretty much be the same process your asking the modpack author to do, just a few extra steps but less potential errors. (not to say that it wont be error free.)

Other games that require third party tools to hook into or hijack them to mod I can't see being able to use this at all (some that require things like texmod)

All of this saying nothing of what it would take to get the permissions straightened out. Not to mention that act of even looking into this could easily become a PR nightmare if one misstep is taken.

So, I guess my long rambling put short. While I don't see what your asking for as viable. I don't see how it can't exist in a different form and how doesn't already do so. Edited by AFKRoger
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In response to post #56561296.

 

 

 

Brabbit1987 wrote:

It has nothing to do with a universal truth. It's just a matter of common sense. I explained that not everyone cares so much about getting things perfectly the way they want them if it means being able to jump in the game a lot quicker.

 

Plus you get to try out new experiences you may not have thought of yourself. How do you know you don't like something till you try it ... right? That's one of the best things about Modded Minecraft. The experience you get from each mod pack can be vastly different. Something you will find is that some people go pretty far and create a pack that incorporates the mods so well together that unless you wanted to spend months doing that yourself, you would have never had that experience. Maybe even a mod developer wants to create a pack and make a mod specific to that pack in Skyrim to do the same sort of thing.

 

At the pack level, things can get very creative when you are trying to peice it all together. A good mod pack developer doesn't just throw everything together and call it a day. They go through extensive testing, balancing, making changes, fixing bugs, sometimes even developing mods themselves to include things that they might not be able to get elsewhere for what they want to do or to try and unify all the mods in a seamless expereince.

 

Also, you are another person who says they don't care if we get the feature. Why do you argue against people who want the feature then if you don't care?

In response to post #56544376. #56544626 is also a reply to the same post.

 

 

 

Ethreon wrote: *shrug* Empty people preach empty words. Let him do his kiddie crusade, ain't like that would suddenly change Dark0ne's mind.acidzebra wrote:

Is he still going? I put him on ignore after it became clear he has no idea about what making mods for either Skyrim or Minecraft entails or why the internals of one game would be more complex than the other, he just wants his one-click toys and to hell with what anyone else wants, even the creators of those toys. What a great member of the 'community'.

In his holy crusade he is so blind to think he has the only, universal, truth. You can show him practical, and even simple, examples related to this very specific game modding mechanics (an infinity of multiple choices always bound to an overriding/merging system) and he will answer taking in account other games. Well, what else to say? The holy crusader doesn't understand that, if devs implement a modpacks support system, it would change 0 in my, yours, and many others Skyrim modding/gaming experience so i really hope they will do it, even just for not reading any more nonsense.

The only way looking at it from a skyrim/fallout perspective to provide a mod pack as I see it. Would be instead to provide a mod that was the merging of those other mods into one mega mod (not necessarily one esp/esm) then it would handle the dependency issue. (Which would probably not be a simple task)

 

Something that I can't imagine happening unless a bunch of authors got together to build a unifying experience.

 

Which has happened before Mods like FWE and Project Nevada. (They are more than what i could call a mod pack but provide what in think your looking for in one)

 

Which would pretty much be the same process your asking the modpack author to do, just a few extra steps but less potential errors. (not to say that it wont be error free.)

 

Other games that require third party tools to hook into or hijack them to mod I can't see being able to use this at all (some that require things like texmod)

 

All of this saying nothing of what it would take to get the permissions straightened out.

 

So, I guess my long rambling put short. While I don't see what your asking for as viable. I don't see how it can't exist in a different form and how doesn't already do so.

 

This site is irritating sometimes. I can write something and it doesn't actually post what I wrote only the quotes. >.>, Nexus forums is so buggy.

 

Anyway, I suggest you go a bit further back to read, because I don't think you understand what I was talking about at all. We are talking about a function for Vortex to be able to read a file that has the information how what mods to download and install and in what order to place them. Meaning no mods would be literally in the pack. They would be grabbed from the same location as if you did it manually.

 

What I went into in my last post was just examples of how far some people could go.

 

Edit: But ya, if a mod pack author wanted to unify some mods, they would likely need to work together with the mod authors for permissions and such and create a mod themselves to upload to the nexus. It's not something everyone could do.

Edited by Brabbit1987
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